02272017
7-Day Forecast | Currently in Provo

Medical Profile: MountainStar Healthcare

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750 W. 800 North, Orem www.timpanogosregionalhospital.com 

To make an appointment for robotic-assisted surgery, please call (866) 887-3999.

Minimally invasive surgery means good things for the people on the operating tables — less scarring, lower blood loss, fewer blood transfusions, lower risk of infection and less trauma overall. It’s better on patients’ bodies and their wallets. Faster recovery times reduce hospitalization costs.

Minimally invasive surgery means good things for the people on the operating tables — less scarring, lower blood loss, fewer blood transfusions, lower risk of infection and less trauma overall. It’s better on patients’ bodies and their wallets. Faster recovery times reduce hospitalization costs.

Timpanogos Regional Hospital’s new investment will provide surgical patients in the county with a minimally invasive alternative. The da Vinci surgical system gives surgeons complete control of four robotic arm attachments designed to cut, grasp, cauterize and dissect tissue. The robotic arms are able to rotate 540 degrees, giving them greater range of motion than the human wrist. Surgeons  control these arms at a console where they view the patient through a high-definition, 3D vision system.

“It’s one more step on the minimally invasive pathway,” says Dr. Brian Gill, Director of Robotic Surgery at Timpanogos Regional Hospital. Dr. Gill brought his robotic surgery expertise to Utah Valley from Denver and serves as a proctor nationally.

“For the surgeon, the best part is the visualization. It’s truly 3D,” Dr. Gill says.

Dr. Jim Crowley, who has experience with more than 150 prostatectomy procedures, performed the first on the machine at Timpanogos last November.

“It gives us such precise definition of the anatomic structures we’ll be working with,” he says.

The system also allows surgeons to be accurate in removing diseased portions of the body while avoiding damage to surrounding structures. Many doctors agree that this system will soon become the standard of care.

“Initially I was a bit skeptical,” says Dr. Jefforey Thorpe. “I didn’t know how much it would add to my practice, but now after going through the training and using it on a few cases I think the increased precision and visibility is a significant improvement over what we were doing before.”

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