Everybody has a story: Piano Mom

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Tami Baird is raising six children with her husband, Scott. Tami runs a piano studio out of her Cedar Hills home and enjoys reading books, inventing games and making jewelry.

Tami Baird is raising six children with her husband, Scott. Tami runs a piano studio out of her Cedar Hills home and enjoys reading books, inventing games and making jewelry.

Tami Baird moved from Texas to Utah when she was 4 years old and has remained in Utah County ever since. Her husband, Scott, built their Cedar Hills home with his own two hands — and Tami jokes that she’s grateful it’s still standing.

As a mother of six and piano teacher of 15, Tami believes her purpose is to teach children how to love and be loved. 

She knows love brings a little bit of harmony to an off-tempo world. 

My earliest memories are of my father cranking classical and Latino music throughout our home. My dad helped me develop an appreciation for music. Now I try to do the same for my children. I expect all of my children to be involved with music in some way until they graduate from high school. And they have to play the piano until they graduate from junior high.

My mother’s family is from Mexico, and her heritage was always part of my life. But before college, I never realized I did things differently than some of my friends. I thought it was perfectly normal to have peanut butter and jelly sandwiches on homemade tortillas.

I met my husband at a pajama dance at UVU’s LDS Institute. He was wearing an Ebenezer Scrooge-style nightgown with a polo collar, which he really did sleep in. His little sister had made it for him. When we married, she made me one, too.

I am a registered nurse. But like many mothers, I wanted to find a way to stay home with my children. That is why I started teaching piano, but there are four piano teachers in my neighborhood so I knew I would have to do things differently if I wanted to stand out.

Teaching is one of my natural talents. I understand how to teach children who learn in non-traditional ways because that is how I learn. My students don’t sit at the keyboard memorizing notes. I use a more kinesthetic approach to teaching.

A quote by Benjamin Franklin hangs on my wall: “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I may remember. Involve me and I will learn.”

Those words say it all for me.

Children have always been my priority. When I was 10, I sincerely wanted to adopt anyone who had lost their parents. My husband and I plan to become foster parents. I firmly believe no child should live without love.

One day, I hope to return to college to study music therapy. But with six kids to get though college, I might have to put my dream on hold for a bit.

For now, we’ll stick to our daily routine: Wake up at 6 a.m. Get the kids ready for the day. Send my husband to work. Teach piano lessons. Clean the house and cook dinner. Get ready for bed.

And start all over to the same beat the very next day.

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Kylee Norton studied English literature at Utah State University. While completing her master's degree, she taught freshmen and sophomore English courses. Since graduating, she has worked as an editorial intern in Los Angeles, a copy writer, and an associate editor for Bennett Communications. She can usually be found with her nose in a book or making adventurous travel plans. She currently lives in Riverton with her husband and daughter.

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