New business Snuck Farm announces first annual heirloom plant sale

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Heirloom tomatoes are one of the plants available at Snuck Farm's first annual plant sale.

Heirloom tomatoes are one of the plants available at Snuck Farm’s first annual plant sale.

If you go

When: Saturday, May 9 from
Where: 504 W. 1100 North in Pleasant Grove, Utah
What: Plant sale including heirloom tomatoes and peppers.
Site: snuckfarm.com

SPONSORED STORY

It’s the time of year to prep and plant your garden in order to yield delicious produce in the fall — and a new Pleasant Grove business is ready to help you realize your garden dreams.

On Saturday, Snuck Farm is holding it’s first annual community plant sale at the farm starting at 8 a.m.until 1 p.m. or until the plants are sold. Over 45 heirloom varieties of tomato and pepper plants in various sizes will be competitively priced for sale along with other assorted vegetables, flowers and herbs.

Heirloom plants grow from seeds that have been handed down from generation to generation and are pollinated by insects or wind, without human intervention.

“Our goal for the plant sale is to engage the community, promote local food production and offer interesting, heirloom varieties of vegetables not readily available in the big box stores and other nurseries in the area,” said Page Westover, who manages the farm along with her husband Brian, and is the granddaughter of ‘Snuck.’

The vegetables and flowers available at the sale were all planted from seeds and grown on-site in their greenhouses.

Plant sale attendees will be encouraged to sign up for the ‘Grow a Row, Share the Harvest’ initiative promoted by Utahns Against Hunger. This program encourages individuals to plant an extra row in their gardens, harvest what is grown, then donate it to community members in need. Snuck Farm will be a drop-off location for donated food and will deliver to local food pantries.

“Our goal for the plant sale is to engage the community, promote local food production and offer interesting, heirloom varieties of vegetables not readily available in the big box stores and other nurseries in the area.” —Page Westover, Snuck Farm manager

The farm is named for Boyd “Snuck” Fugal who, along with his wife Venice, cultivated the land where the greenhouses are now located. Hydroponics was chosen for this spot because of the small acreage left of the 160 acres originally farmed by Boyd.  The Westovers wanted to maximize production of the land in an environmentally friendly way. Their hydroponic operation will produce more than four times the yield of traditional farming while using a fraction of the water required in the field.

Snuck Farm’s property includes a functional barn with room for animals, hay, farm equipment and offices.  There is a commercial kitchen on site where future classes will be held and food from the land prepared and preserved.  A farmstand where locals can buy fresh greens and other produce is also planned for the future.

The mission of Snuck Farm is to be a force for good in the community. They work to produce the freshest, highest quality food in the local marketplace and teach and promote industrious ideas about healthy food and sustainable, community-based food production.  Their hydroponic systems are being used to grow pesticide-free produce using ecologically sustainable methods in technologically-sophisticated, climate-controlled greenhouses at the farm. They will provide retail, restaurant and institutional customers with a reliable, year-round, local supply of produce grown under the highest standards of quality and food safety.

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