08192017

Brick by brick: A then and now look at Utah County buildings

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmail

Though the owners didn’t lay the cornerstones, modern-day entrepreneurs are making history with structures built 100 years ago.

Then

Downtown-Provo

(Photo courtesy of L. Tom Perry Special Collections, BYU)

Just west of these shops in historic Downtown Provo is Mullet-Hoover, a jewelry and engraving company that has been shining diamonds and fixing watches in the same shop on Center Street since 1926. Frank Mullett opened shop to bring in a few extra dollars during the Depression.

Now

Downtown-Provo-now

“We’ve seen a lot of businesses come and go around us, so we love knowing that the shop my husband’s grandfather started is still thriving today,” says Jana Hoover, a Mullet-Hoover employee.

Then

AF-Bank-old

(Photo courtesy Utah State Historical Society)

This historic building in American Fork was home to a different bank until it closed permanently during the Depression. The Bank of American Fork first opened in 1913 and also closed during the Depression, but reopened in the 1960s, and is now headquartered in the discontinued bank’s original location.

Now

AF-Bank-now

(Photo courtesy Bank of American Fork)

“By restoring this old building on Main Street and uncovering the original ceiling, we are reminded daily of the time and effort others put into building it over 100 years ago,” says Richard Beard, president and CEO of the bank.

Then

Provo-4th-Ward

(Photo courtesy of L. Tom Perry Special Collections, BYU)

The Provo 4th Ward building looks just about the same on the outside as it did when it was built in 1914. But the inside? Different story. Greg Soter traded pulpits for pantries and benches for bedrooms when he converted the building into 15 high-end apartments, 12 of which have already been sold (including the one pictured below).

Now

chapel-today

“When I drove by the building five years ago and saw the ‘for sale’ sign, I knew immediately what to do,” says Greg Soter, owner of the Old Chapel Apartments. “I couldn’t let a building like this go to waste in a historic community like Provo, so I decided to divide it into apartments. I’m not a raging preservationist, but it’s satisfying for me to know that we’ve taught this building how to preserve itself for another 50-100 years.”

The brick wall and stained glass give this apartment a one-of-a-kind (and already-sold) charm. It took two years to construct the 15 single-bedroom units.

The brick wall and stained glass give this apartment a one-of-a-kind (and already-sold) charm. It took two years to construct the 15 single-bedroom units.

Like this story(0)

Leave a Reply

Submit Comment