Anti-feminist, pro-rape group plans meeting at Provo temple

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Temple’s Architectural Digest Provo Tabernacle was originally designed in Victorian Gothic style. The bricks on the Provo City Center Temple are the original bricks from the Provo Tabernacle. The Angel Moroni now stands on the central tower that was removed in 1917 due to structural problems. (Photo by Alisha Gallagher)

Return of the Kings, a group of men who are pro rape, will hold a protest outside of the Provo City Center Temple on Saturday, Feb. 6. (Photo by Alisha Gallagher)

The front of Provo City Center Temple will be the site of a meetup at 8 p.m. Saturday for men who are part of the pro-rape Return of the Kings movement.

Members of the group reportedly are meeting in more than 40 countries, with two rallies planned in Utah. The other is now scheduled for the Salt Lake City Library, at the top of the amphitheater. Those locations may change, though, as the group learns about protests planned for the sites. Only heterosexual adult men are allowed at the rallies. Women, no matter what they look like, will be told to leave.

An anti-Return of the Kings protest also is being planned. The group plans to have anti-rape signs, and is warning participants to be cautious and bring pepper spray in case the men get violent.

On the group’s website, founder Daryush Valizadeh writes, “Since this meetup was never intended as a confrontation with unattractive women and their enablers, I’m moving to save as many of these meetups as I can before Saturday so that men can still meet in private away from a loud, obnoxious, dishonest and potentially violent mob.” If the location is changed, people who want to attend must prove that they aren’t women and that they were interested in the meetup before Jan. 15 — either with previous participation on the website or purchase of one of Valizadeh’s books.

Valizadeh is a self-proclaimed pickup artist and writer who’s also known as Roosh V. Among other anti-woman rhetoric, he advocates against women’s rights; says most rape accusations are false; and claims that a woman’s value is in her fertility and beauty, while a man’s value is his “resources, intellect and character.”

Valizadeh believes that women who are raped while they are drunk should be held accountable and that they are giving consent by not preventing rape by choosing not to drink. He’s proposed to “make rape legal if done on private property” in the same post.

“Let’s make rape legal,” Valizadeh writes. “Less women will be raped because they won’t voluntarily drug themselves with booze and follow a strange man into a bedroom, and less men will be unfairly jailed for what was anything but a maniacal alley rape. Until then, this devastating rape culture will continue, and women who we treat as children will continue to act like children.”

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Amie Rose has more than 14 years of experience writing and editing at newspapers in Utah and New Mexico. She graduated from BYU with a degree in journalism. She lives in Utah Valley with her husband, toddler and crazy dog.

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