09192017

LDS woman organizes race to help fellow recovering porn addicts

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The Pummel Pornography 5K is on Saturday, April 23 at 8 a.m. Race entries for one person is $25 or $75 for a group of four.

The Pummel Pornography 5K is on Saturday, April 23 at 8 a.m. Race entries for one person is $25 or $75 for a group of four. Proceeds go toward counseling scholarships for people recovering from a pornography addiction. Register at pummelpornography.com.

Pummel Pornography 5K

When: Saturday, April 23 at 8 a.m.
Where: Lindon City Park
Cost: $25 for one person or $75 for a group of four
Site: pummelpornography.com

It’s a “man’s problem.”

That’s what Suzy Jordan grew up believing. Pornography addiction was a problem specific to men — so why then was she struggling with it?

“There’s so many people that were in the same situation, but we are all so scared to talk about it because it’s the taboo thing — the thing that no one is supposed to do,” the Orem native said.

Pornography is a growing epidemic. In fact, the Utah Senate officially declared pornography a public health crisis in February. SCR9 does not make pornography illegal, but does call for more education, prevention, research and policy changes in raising awareness about the affects of pornography.

In 2015, people spent approximately 4.3 billion hours on Pornhub, one of the top pornography sites on the Internet, according to Pornhub’s annual report. Women account for 33 percent of porn viewers.

Jordan didn’t want to fit a pornography addiction statistic — so she did something about it.

“You hear people say they are grateful for their trial and you think, ‘I don’t know if I could ever be grateful for a trial,’ but I truly am,” Jordan said. “It’s like if I hadn’t had this struggle, I never would have stumbled on my strength. I think that in our troubles we find our passions.”

Her strength is her ability to share her story and her passion is preventing other people from feeling the pain she has felt. Now Jordan is trying to teach people how to prevent pornography addiction and making sure they know what resources are available. Her current effort is organizing a 5K, Pummel Pornography, in Lindon for Saturday, April 23.

“It’s not about making money — it’s truly because I went through this and I know how awful it is and how hopeless you feel that I want people to get help,” Jordan said.

She knows because she has experienced the lows, the hopelessness and the feeling of defeat. Luckily, her story doesn’t end on a low, but takes a long road from hiding and shame to vulnerability and recovery.

Suzy Jordan, organizer of Pummel Pornography 5K, decided to speak out about her pornography addiction to help others find the help they need for recovery. (Photo courtesy Suzy Jordan)

Suzy Jordan, organizer of Pummel Pornography 5K, decided to speak out about her pornography addiction to help others find the help they need for recovery. (Photo courtesy Suzy Jordan)

Her Story

Eleven. That was the age Jordan had her first encounter with pornography, which fits the national statistic for the average age (8-11) that a child is first exposed to pornography. She remembers hearing about sex and turning to the Internet for answers. Her interest snowballed from there and the situation escalated until Jordan knew what she was doing was wrong, but continued viewing pornography, so she turned to her parents for help at age 14.

The family worked together helping Jordan eliminate pornography from her life and Jordan led her family to believe that she was recovered. But Jordan wasn’t healed. She had stopped talking about her usage and gone back to hiding.

It wasn’t until college when she confessed to a close friend about her pornography usage that she began seeing a therapist in the BYU Counseling Center, but even there she buried her reasons for seeing a therapist, allowing her therapists to believe she was there to treat her depression and eating disorder.

“The key to recovery is vulnerability because when you are hiding it, you’re ashamed of it,” Jordan said, “so the more open you are with it, it takes all the shame away and you have more of a support system so that even when you’re having a hard time … you’ll have more people to talk to.”

As Jordan sought out programs to help her overcome her addiction, she ignored the need for vulnerability. A member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Jordan tried the 12-step program, but to no avail.

“One thing isn’t going to work for everyone,” Jordan said. “Twelve-step programs didn’t work for me; they just caused me major anxiety.”

“There were times I literally had hands over my face because I couldn’t face up to the things I had done that I thought were so disgusting. Almost every single time (my counselor) would say, ‘Do you have any idea how many people tell me that they’ve done that same thing?’” —Suzy Jordan, race organizer

It wasn’t until Jordan admitted her struggle to her LDS bishop and he recommended a therapist who specialized in sexual addictions that Jordan accepted that vulnerability.

“I was so nervous, but my therapist made me feel so incredibly comfortable,” Jordan said. “There were times I literally had hands over my face because I couldn’t face up to the things I had done that I thought were so disgusting. Almost every single time she would say, ‘Do you have any idea how many people tell me that they’ve done that same thing?’

“It is freeing in a way because we all just think we are so unique and that our problems are so unique and that no one understands. I was going to that counseling center for a year and a half before I really started to see progress. It was slowly allowing me to tell the truth about the whole situation and then trusting the people around me. It’s and ordeal every single time; it’s not easy to tell someone your deepest, darkest secret and that’s what I considered it my entire life. It was my deepest, darkest secret that no one could find out about or else they would think I was some sort of pervert.”

Jordan, now 25, began opening up to more friends and family members. She found solace and developed a program that worked for her, which included family history work and setting boundaries for where she could use her phone and computer. Then she began speaking out.

It was her therapist at Addo Recovery who suggested Jordan organize a race to raise awareness about pornography and the treatments available for addicts.

The Race

Jordan followed her therapist’s advice and decided to do something about the ignorance and secretive way people dealt with pornography. She organized Pummel Pornography, a nonprofit 5K race hosted by Women For Decency and meant to raise pornography awareness.

“The money we earn is creating counseling scholarships for people who want to change their life and want to get over this addiction that they have, but don’t have the finances to get that counseling because it can be pretty pricy,” Jordan said.

“This is the mental illness that we can prevent. You can’t really prevent depression. You can’t really prevent anxiety. … The more we talk about it, the less people are going to be curious and search about it.” —Suzy Jordan, race organizer

People who are interested in receiving one of the scholarships can apply at pummelpornography.com.

Plus, she is aiming for a family-friendly environment. It’s a good way for parents to easily bring up the issue of pornography and teach their children in a safe environment. There will be multiple resources available around the race course to learn more about pornography as an illness.

“This is the mental illness that we can prevent,” Jordan said. “You can’t really prevent depression. You can’t really prevent anxiety. And sure there might be some people with addictive tendencies, but the more we talk about it, the less people are going to be curious and search about it.”

Registration for the Pummel Pornography 5K on April 23 costs $25 for one person or $75 for a group of four. To register, visit pummelpornography.com. Or you can donate to help raise awareness at pummelpornography.com.

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11 Responses to "LDS woman organizes race to help fellow recovering porn addicts"

  1. Tammy says:

    I’m sorry but there is no such thing as “porn addiction,” or “sex addiction.” Your insurance will not pay for it, you cannot bill them for it, it is not part of the DSM 5 because there is no data to back up the claim.

    Problematic sexual behavior has its roots in religious psychosexual shame, and underlying issues such as anxiety, depression, or even personality or mood disorders. This sexual shaming in the state of Utah is making the “problem” worse. Other states laugh as we talk about this pseudo problem. Neuroscientists are aghast every time we bring it up.

    STOP THE MADNESS, stop the sexual shaming and fear tactics used to control people’s sexuality and you will see the numbers of problematic behavior decrease.

    • Tony says:

      That’s because those who review the mental illnesses are suffering from porn addiction already. How can you get peer reviews, etc… when you can’t find the people that aren’t struggling with it …?

  2. Emily says:

    Porn is not the problem! Sexist religions are the problem. Patriarchy is the problem. Ideals about sexuality translated into reality are the problem. Adults completely out of touch with their bodies and sexuality is the problem. Religions that act like they have any authority over what you do to or with your body is the problem. Creepy older men talking to 12 year old boys and girls about what they do with their bodies is the problem. Porn will always exist and has always existed, but is greatest in communities that are less educated and more restricted on sexuality. Humans are not naturally monogamous and religion teaches that being human is an enemy to “God”, so now guilt is the layer religion holds over the human. Remove the controlling religion and oppressive views on two people owning each other for life (marriage as it is and not as it could be), and porn “addiction” normalizes. Your “fight” on the religion caused porn epidemic is aimed at the person using porn not the system that makes the usage of it out of normal human scope. Organized oppressive religions that indoctrinate that your humanity is an enemy is the real enemy. Humans are designed to relieve stress through sex or war – take your pick!

  3. Droundy says:

    It is my understanding that when something controls your life it is an addiction. Chocolate is an addiction for me and I am sure it is not mentioned on the DSM 5. When something controls your life and it is not you, it is what we call an addiction and it does not need a diagnosis.
    She is a wise woman to realize that pornogrphy is taking her where she does not want to go and it was controlling her life.
    Pornography on the internet is constructed in such a way to addict a person and very quickly. It is a well mastered science and those who study it understand how to create a mouse trap on the interent to snare the human mouse. Others may deny it, but that does not make their denials of this fact a reality.
    We watched that with cigarettes when I was young. The companies knew how to hook people. Cigarettes were everywhere glamourous, sporty, elegant, masculine and eventually feminine. “You’ve got your own cigarette now, baby!” Was a catchy and popular song that I still remember well though I never smoked. Every movie and TV show had smokers on it. Even people who did not smoke would act as if they did, often for an endorsement price.
    The medical doctors and a few religions taught that they were harmful to our health, yet most people disagreed. Their disagreement did not change the reality that cigarettes were harmful. Their denial did not make cigarette smoking a safe reality.
    There are other ways of releiving stress than only war and sex. Sports, recreation, play, service, going out with friends and beingwith family aree some examples. Sex and war is a very narrow solution when there is a wonderful plethora of choices available to the complex human beings that we are.

  4. Christian says:

    The problem here is religion shaming any sexuality. You are shaming young boys and girls for having very natural desires, and telling them if they even masturbate just once, that they are worthless and going to hell, making them feel guilty for doing something that is hurting nobody.

    You want to help the kids, tell them they aren’t going to hell just for touching themselves. Until then, all this crap is just hurting them.

  5. Lori says:

    Yes it is a legitimate problem and this is being suppressed by the Lefts agenda. http://www.rehabs.com/pro-talk-articles/new-research-supports-sexual-addiction-as-a-legitimate-diagnosis/
    Sorry but there are plenty of sex addicts outside of Utah Emily and Tammy. There are people that are sitting in jail as rapists and child molesters who started with porn. There are children being abused because of sexual addiction of which I happened to be one of. Lives are destroyed by this trash. Unless you’ve been in the position and struggled with it you wouldn’t know. Perhaps you are trying to sear your own conscience for your own sexual deviance. It’s a problem and I applaud this young lady for her courage and humility in raising awareness on such a horrible snare in the lives of so many men and women.

  6. Matthew says:

    Living chastity is a wonderful feeling. It is the best feeling in the world. I have a feeling of dignity and self-worth. I love it. I love walking and noticing the beauty of mountains, fresh air, and enjoying life. How different that would be if I was glued to a screen making out women as if they were objects. There is no way to express how good it feels each and every day to live this way, and I invite you to give it a try. I don’t feel anxiety or guilt trying to resist, because every day it’s easier to do so when you find better outlets, and aren’t constantly watching tv shows or look at websites that constantly remind you of it.

  7. Jim says:

    Emily, Tammy, and Christian, you are deceived. Pornography IS an addiction to those who struggle with it. Many things are to many different people and they are not specifically mentioned in the DSM. Which, BTW is veering toward normalizing pedophilia in a future version. The APA is already toying with that idea. Not everything we think to do with our bodies is good.

    Also, porn is not a victimless thing. The women portrayed are often abused or are held captive by blackmail to do the things depicted. Sometimes they are literally held captive as sex slaves. You need to do some serious research. Stop sniggering at people and start putting yourselves in others’ shoes.

  8. Randy says:

    Religious pressure or improper guilt trips notwithstanding, the results speak for themselves. I personally know a family devastated by a father’s porn addiction. I helped his ex move to a home a couple of years after she divorced and taking on the role of the home’s provider. Her husband hid it well until she discovered dozens of “hidden” tapes around the house. I knew him as an ambitious, enterprising young man. His addiction stunted his ability to reason and to maintain employment. They lived in poverty, accepted state assistance. When she was able to treat her children to McDonald’s, they cried with joy. She’s now a successful business woman and advocate for Internet safety.

  9. Kyle says:

    Stop fooling yourselves thinking pornograghy is not an addiction. Read the book “He Restoreth My Soul” by Dr.Don Hilton. Dr Hilton is a Neurosurgeon who has researched pornography and reveals the science behind pornography addictions and states that this addiction is stronger that most drugs on the street. So no this is not pseudoscience. It is real and has the potential to destroy your life if you give in to it.

  10. Anonymous says:

    When someone wants to stop a behavior but is unable to over and over for years on end, that’s an addiction. I’ve struggled with pornography addiction for over 15 years. I don’t even know how many times I promised myself that time was the last time, and this is common with any kind of addiction. It’s a terrible feeling to feel so out of control. Luckily there are so many people/organizations that help with addictions, even pornography addictions. Even if you feel it is not an addiction, think about the people involved in making the pornography and read about how most of them are doing so against their own will.

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