ICYMI: BYU to drop PBS and classical music; Elizabeth Smart, Deondra Brown join voices to combat sexual abuse

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BYU is dropping PBS and the classical music station to focus its attention on shows — like “Studio C” — that can reach a national audience. (Photo by MaryLyne Linge)

In case you took a break from the news this weekend, here are a few local stories from the weekend to help you catch up on the know.

BYU to drop PBS and classical music in pursuit of national products

Starting on June 30, 2018, KBYU-TV will drop “Sesame Street” and its entire PBS affiliation as well as Classical 89 FM, the Deseret News reported. BYU announced that this move will allow BYUtv to focus its efforts on creating family-friendly content that can reach a national audience, such as sketch comedy show, “Studio C,” and its new science fiction show, “Extinct.” Read more at deseretnews.com.

Elizabeth Smart and The 5 Browns’ Deondra Brown join voices to combat sexual abuse

Right on the tail of last week’s #MeToo social media conversation about sexual assault, Elizabeth Smart and The 5 Browns’ Deondra Brown encouraged people to “make noise” about sexual abuse, the Deseret News reported. The two joined together in hopes of changing the discussion from ‘I’ve never told anyone’ to ‘people have powerful stories and we need to listen.’”

“We’re here and we’re talking about big, dark, scary issues, issues that we don’t want to talk about,” Smart said. “… And I think it’s even harder to admit that something has happened to you but being here tonight, what’s going on in the media with Harvey Weinstein and the #MeToo campaign, and this is a time where it is making more noise and we’re going to continue to expand this campaign, to expand these events where we talk about these issues because the more people we can bring in and educate, the more noise we can make, which will eventually change the system.”

Read the full story on deseretnews.com.

Utah Olympic venues will need $40 million in updates — even if it doesn’t host another Winter Olympics

Whether of not Utah is able to win the bid to host the 2026 Winter Olympics, the Utah Olympic facilities will need another $40 million in updates, the Salt Lake Tribune reported. A legislative audit of the Utah Olympic Legacy Foundation revealed that the continued use of three Olympic venues in Utah means these venues need repairs over the next 10 years to ensure safety.

The suggestions include a $5 million upgrade to the bobsled track retaining walls at the Olympic Park and $2.3 million in new asphalt and guardrails in the canyon above Park City. The Oval needs an estimated $1.75 million in roof repairs as well as an approximately $1 million boiler and chiller replacement. At Soldier Hollow, upgrades for a new water system and snow-making machine land around $1 million. Read the full story at sltrib.com.

Utah jobless rate drops to 3.4 percent

Utah’s job market continues to rank as one of the best in the country, according to the Deseret News. A report by the Department of Workforce Services revealed nonfarm payroll employment for September 2017 grew by an estimated 2.4 percent over the past 12 months, adding 35,100 jobs to the economy year over year. Dropping one-tenth of a percent, Utah now has an unemployment rate of 3.4 percent. Read the full story on deseretnews.com.

American Fork Art Dye Park design nearly complete

The final design for Art Dye Park in American Fork should be completed by February, the Daily Herald reported. In a presentation to the American Fork City Council, Derric Rykert, American Fork Parks and Recreation director, said the park should be playable by late 2019. The construction of the park will be completed in three phases. Read the full story on heraldextra.com.

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Rebecca Lane

While her first language is sarcasm, Rebecca dabbles in English and Russian to achieve her lifelong dream of being a journalist. A BYU sports fan, reading enthusiast and wannabe world traveler, Rebecca is a Colorado transplant that is convinced Colorado's mountains are much larger than the many Utah County peaks. Rebecca manages UtahValley360.com for Bennett Communications. Follow her on Twitter @rebeccalane.

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