Are you a toxic boss?

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(Stock Photo)

Well, not you, of course. Those other bosses down the hall …

We asked employees from some of our largest local companies to share what they love in a boss — and what they definitely do not.

Here’s what we learned. #likeitornot

#LIKEABOSS: What employees love in a boss

  • Communication. We’re talking across the board — everything from the mission of the organization to letting us know when a meeting will be rescheduled. We want to know where we are going, and how we fit in.
  • Leads by example. A great boss should be the hardest working member of the team.
  • Collaboration. Someone who works with us to determine what needs to be done, rather than dictating (too much direction) or blind delegation (not enough).
  • Level-headedness. Someone who remains calm and collected under duress.
  • Problem solver. Someone who focuses on solutions rather than harping on the negativeGood listening skills. Someone who seeks to understand.
  • Promotes kindness. And patience. And HUMOR. #haha
  • All for one, one for all. When the team succeeds, a great boss gives team members all the credit; when the team fails, a great boss takes responsibility.
  • Tough conversations. If we don’t feel like we can present our concerns or have respectful disagreements, it makes the relationship more complicated and less productive.
  • Trusts employees. Give us ownership over projects.
  • Inspires. Help us improve and grow!
  • Offers consistent and regular feedback. How we doin’?
  • People first. Let us know we are more important than any mistake we might have made.
  • An advocate. Manage “up” as well as down.
  • Mentors. Willing to talk career paths.
  • Stays positive. Even during tough times, sees potential.
  • Someone who keeps an eye on workloads. Says “no” to the organization if the workload gets out of hand.
  • Transparency. And honesty, please! #truth
  • Shows appreciation. Both verbally and non-verbally.
  • Challenges us. Give us opportunities to take risks and swing for the fences (and sometimes fail).
  • Sets the tone. Preferably an enjoyable one.
  • Friendship. Someone who knows (and cares!) what’s going on in various areas of our lives.
  • Takes pride in hiring smart people. Don’t just prove that YOU are the smart person.
  • The ability to lead. See each team member as an individual and know how to utilize our particular skill sets.
  • Sets realistic, timely goals. Lay out clear expectations.
  • Flexibility. We are so grateful for bosses who value work-life balance and trust us to get the job done.
  • Someone who cares about our success. Don’t just focus on the success of the company.

#LIKEATOXICBOSS: What drives employees crazy in a boss

  • Eager to take credit, quick to pass blame.
  • Arrogance. Egos. Tantrums. Rudeness. Condescension.
  • Stays in their office. Avoids being part of the team.
  • Is the gossiper-in-chief.
  • Delegates duties without adequate training or support.
  • Insensitive to the needs of team members.
  • Hits the panic button. Big or small, everything’s a fire drill! #stopdropandrollyoureyes
  • Cynicism. Sometimes bosses gripe to their teams as a way to show solidarity, but it leads to a toxic environment.
  • Absent bosses and micromanagers. Both are less than ideal. Find the happy medium!
  • Someone who cares more about how much time I sit in my chair than the work I’m accomplishing. #timeout
  • Long-windedness — someone who cannot separate important details from the less important.
  • Criticizes us publicly.
  • Someone who offers no feedback.
  • Sets unrealistic goals.
  • Manages everyone as if they have the same personality.
  • Gives tasks with no clarity. And then is upset when we can’t read their minds.
  • Makes assumptions. Talk to us! We’ll tell you what’s up if you tell us what’s up.
  • Someone who is afraid to stand up for you as a team member — particularly with higher management.
  • Does not share reasonings for decisions they make and doesn’t get buy-in from the group.
  • Reschedules meetings often — it disrespects our time.
  • Power hungry — only cares about their own career.
  • Someone who is never willing to do the grunt work.
  • Creates a culture of distrust, disharmony, unhealthy competition, or fear.
  • Creates obstacles for us rather than removing them.
  • Someone who can’t enjoy the victories. There will ALWAYS be another goal to reach, but if you can’t celebrate the victories, you will lose employee morale. And fast.

#LIKEANEMPLOYEEE

Big thanks to the employees from these great companies for helping us compile these lists: Qualtrics, Provo, Domo, American Fork, Chatbooks, Provo, eLearning Brothers, American Fork, Complete Merchant Solutions and Orem.

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